Black lives really do matter

No doubt I will face a backlash for this like I did on Twitter earlier, but I’m not ever going to stop asking questions that are relevant to the society we live in. I asked earlier if supporters of the ‘black lives matter‘ movement was going too far by rioting, vandalism and looting, and I had mixed responses, but the majority suggested that for any movement to succeed there needs action, which I do agree with to an extent, but African Americans have been oppressed for centuries, and despite the civil rights movement in the sixties, violence and protests happened, ‘Martin Luther King‘, and ‘Malcolm X‘ were assassinated, and what really changed? America currently has a President that’s got a huge following of evangelical, right wing, white supremacists, that hold positions in office, government, the police force and the judicial system. Is rioting, looting and vandalism the answer? No, it isn’t.

The issue of racism is deeply rooted in society, especially in certain parts of America, where society has little to no tolerance for the black, and Hispanic culture. Support for them has gained momentum world wide, which is great, but is the destruction of public property, or the tearing down of statues acceptable? The world is listening, but I’m starting to think that it’s seeing the actions of many as being unacceptable, and destructive to the cause against injustice. Do the black lives matter human rights movement approve of the way that this is being carried out, as I would imagine they’d want to fight against the oppression, and systematic racism imposed on the black community peacefully. The black lives matter movement has thirteen guiding principles, and not one of them focuses on rioting, looting, violence or vandalism, and despite several people claiming that you have to fight fire with fear, and spill blood for blood, that isn’t the answer. Education is the answer, and reform. The police force involved need to be made an example of, and punished severely, and police chiefs need to accept responsibility for the actions of their officers or nothing will change.

Thirteen guiding principles

Restorative Justice is the commitment to build a beloved and loving community that is sustainable and growing.

Empathy is one’s ability to connect with others by building relationships built on mutual trust and understanding.

Loving Engagement is the commitment to practice justice, liberation and peace.

Diversity is the celebration and acknowledgment of differences and commonalities across cultures.

Globalism is our ability to see how we are impacted or privileged within the Black global family that exists across the world in different regions.

Transgender Affirming is the commitment to continue to make space for our trans siblings by encouraging leadership and recognizing trans-antagonistic violence, while doing the work required to dismantle cisgender privilege and uplift Black trans folk.

Queer Affirming is working towards a queer-affirming network where heteronormative thinking no longer exists.

Collective Value means that all Black lives, regardless of actual or perceived sexual identity, gender identity, gender expression, economic status, ability, disability, religious beliefs or disbeliefs, immigration status or location, matter.

Intergenerational is a space free from ageism where we can learn from each other.

Black Families creates a space that is family friendly and free from patriarchal practices.

Black Villages is the disruption of Western nuclear family dynamics and a return to the “collective village” that takes care of each other.

Black Women is the building of women-centered spaces free from sexism, misogyny, and male-centeredness.

Unapologetically Black is the affirmation that Black Lives Matter and that our love, and desire for justice and freedom are prerequisites for wanting that for others. These principles are the blueprint for healing and do not include nor do they support ignoring or sanitizing the ugliness and discomfort that comes with dealing with race and anti-race issues.

I am extremely sympathetic to each one of their guiding principles, and it’s sad that the world we live in has to have a movement like this because racism is still a large worldwide concern. The question that I asked on Twitter was not only is the looting, rioting, and vandalism going too far, but do actors need to apologise for comedy about black people, or shows being pulled from TV? I wasn’t trying to make a point that I agreed with the shows in question being allowed to make jokes about black people, or blackening up for roles, I genuinely asked because will it go too far? Will anyone that plays an LBGTQ character have to apologise for incorrect portrayal? I know we want equality, and fairness, but a white person blacking up is racist, but a black person whitening up isn’t. You can’t have double standards if you want equality for all. People seem to forget that racism can be a two way street, and because black people have been oppressed doesn’t mean that some aren’t racially against white people, or other creeds. But as soon as you dare say something like that, that’s considering a little controversial, I’m accused of being ignorant, or racist, or someone who doesn’t understand because I’m a white privileged man. Despite that, I’d have dragged that police officer off ‘George Floyd‘ even if there was a risk of being shot. Preservation of life, and dignity is paramount.

2 thoughts on “Black lives really do matter

  1. It will take another one hundred years to teach our children not to hate, and be part of the human race and feel unified. Your article is a good read for the open minded person. We need more of those people.

    Liked by 1 person

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